Vice Squad

By Karen Parr-Moody


The morals police have made it darn near impossible to smoke cigarettes in any restaurant in the United States. And drinking, naturally, goes hand in hand with such a vice. But, luckily, even those who don't drink or smoke can own one of the fun vintage accoutrements required by either vice.

 

 

 

Jim Beam, one of the best selling bourbons in the world, comes from little 'ole Clermont, Kentucky. It has been produced since 1795 by seven generations of the Beam family. In the late 1960s, these animal decanters, as seen in the photo, right, became popular (cat, left, $85; cat, right, $48; both at Booth B0225). Many of these Jim Beam decanters are fine china made by Regal China. They depict an array of subjects, including cars, trains, animals, people and states.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

Even for those not flying to the yuppie backcountry of Jackson Hole, Wy., this ice bucket slathered with skiers would certainly add flair to any cabin or tent scenario (photo right, vintage ice bucket with skiers, $20; Booth B-113). Yes, sleeping under the stars, noshing around a campfire, dozing off to the sounds of nature: They're all better when accompanied by the sound of ice rattling around in a gin and tonic, no?

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Another choice for an ice bucket is the vintage hammered aluminum version seen in the photo, right (ice bucket and tongs, $32; Booth B-2028). It would date from the 1930s to the 1950s, when such pieces arrived in homes, often as wedding gifts. Although some called aluminum ware "poor man's silver," one can see by the details -- such as the well-made floral handles on this piece, that they were not merely designed to appeal to the masses. Aluminum was specifically designed to attract the affluent, as well.
 

 

 

 


This buck-festooned decanter with two shot glasses would be perfect for Ernest Hemmingway (photo, left, $36; Booth B-110). Could youln't see him rooting around the jungles with this set nestled amid his hunting gear?  

The Lakewood Elks Lodge 1432 was established in 1922 in Lakewood, New Jersey. This hand-painted ashtray from the club features not an elk, but a buck (photo, right, $25; Booth B-110). But no matter. It's super cute, no matter what the critter.

While tobacco products have no personal benefit, the treasure trove of gear related to vice habits is fun to collect. And as far as retro drinking accoutrements go, GasLamp has enough to complete more than a few "Mad Men" sets.


 

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